Outdoor News Bulletin

Outdoor News Bulletin

December 2017 Edition | Volume 71, Issue 12 | Published since 1946

North American Special Session: Conservation Built to Last through Collaboration and Unusual Voices

Collaborative conservation is not one-size-fits-all. In fact, some have called collaboration processes a “black box.” Yet collaborative conservation has been viewed as a way to achieve balance and determine acceptable trade-offs between diverse human interests, ecosystem health, and the conservation and management of wildlife. Conservation Built to Last: Advancing Engagement, Inclusion, and Shared Purpose to Address the Challenges of the Future will discuss lessons learned through the challenges and successes of collaborative conservation. This is one of four concurrent special sessions at the 83rd North American Wildlife and Natural Resources Conference scheduled for March 26-30 at the Hilton Norfolk, The Main in Norfolk, Virginia.

Read more >

Northwest Boreal LCC and BEACONs Release Conservation Framework for Region

WMI’s partners in Alaska and Canada have developed a new approach for proactive planning for landscape conservation that incorporates adaptive management in the context of uncertainty and change across the boreal forest. The result is a scientific framework for comprehensive conservation planning that includes consideration of both protected areas and lands managed for a variety of economic and cultural values.

Read more >

What Hunters Can Do to Stop Chronic Wasting Disease

As more than 11 million hunters slip into the woods to enjoy the bounty of our nation’s wildlife resources, they likely hear about a sometimes vague, and always concerning disease affecting deer, elk, and moose: Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD). Although scientists have known about the disease since the 1960’s and have been actively managing it for more than thirty years, CWD still manages to cultivate uncertainty, concern, and sometimes, downright paranoia.

Read more >

NatureScape: A Landscape Conservation Design Decision-Making Tool Developed for Appalachia

The most basic question that conservation professionals often face is, “Why is this place important?” Biologists, managers, planners, researchers, and other resource professionals frequently focus on site-based issues and the determination of the relative importance of the site to achieving desired conservation objectives. However, several more complex, and often more important, questions are: “What other resources and conservation targets are also within the target and surrounding areas?” and Where do we get the most conservation ‘bang for the buck’?”

Read more >
Cooperative Research Unit Corner

Winners and Losers Among $1 Billion World-Class Alaska Salmon Fisheries

Pacific salmon face an uncertain future due to accelerated climate and landscape change, according to a synthesis paper published in the October 2017 edition of the journal Fisheries. Researchers from the University of Alaska Fairbanks Institute of Arctic Biology, University of Alaska Anchorage, University of Alaska Southeast, U.S. Geological Survey and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service examined patterns of climate, landscapes and fisheries in the past 70 years to help understand where salmon ecosystems may be headed. They focused on the Kenai River in Southcentral Alaska.

Read more >